5 Underserved Niches in Copywriting

While searching for work, I have read a million sites, a million job applications, and a million gurus talking about getting work. I also thought that there must be some underserved niches that I could get into that might help me create side jobs along the way.

I found out that most of the underserved niches involved technical writing, and that type of writing spun off into a million splinters. I must be on the “millions” kick since I am measuring everything in the millions these days.

Technical copywriting is writing instructions as clearly and concisely as you can for people who need help understanding how to do something.

It would seem that the underserved “type of writing” is technical writing, but the underserved categories are what I was looking for.

For those who haven’t done technical writing, it is the writing behind your user manuals and other “how to” type writings, including tutorials.

In my previous life, I was a beta tester for a piece of graphic design software for many years and many versions. Along the way, I wrote tutorials to accompany the software for other users to share, so I have a solid grasp on writing tutorials, but in my real writing life of today, I only write some “how to” articles for car owners. I don’t even supply photos for the articles, so if I go back to technical writing, I want to write about a subject that I like.

Copywriting Markets that Need Writers

I think, and I use the term “think” loosely, that I have found that there is or will be a large market for copywriters and technical writers in the following industries:

Software – this may not be an underserved market, but it is always changing as new software is created and programs are updated. SaaS is a big industry as fewer people own their software and more people sign up for cloud-based software. People have to know how to use it.

Healthcare – baby boomers like me are getting ready to retire, and we need to have everything written down for us. Consider what it takes to get an MRI and write down the patient’s instructions. These are the types of things that are needed for all types of equipment, doctors, specialties, dentists, and more. Like software, technology makes huge changes in healthcare daily.

Environmental – I write about EV cars, but not on the technical side of it. There is a market for those interested in sustainable and renewable energies, as well as many “how to” articles such as gardening, composting, and anything related to getting “earthy”.

B2B – anything that a business needs to market to another business is a good place to look for work. Start with a small business in your community and work your way up from there.

Translation – if you are bilingual, there is a place for you in the technical writing industry. With businesses working globally, your skills can help them present their products to more people.

Who needs Technical Writers?

Anyone in the above-mentioned industries needs technical writers, as well as the following:

  • Technology companies
  • Manufacturing companies
  • Government agencies
  • Colleges and schools
  • Service industries

Some of the products any of these businesses may need include manuals, troubleshooting guides, employee instructions, course materials, online tutorials, maintenance manuals, safety information, product specifications, and installation manuals.

There are things to write everywhere you look. Remember reading the cereal box when you were a kid because you “had to read”? Someone wrote that. You have to find the right person to talk to when it comes time to pitch your ideas.

How do you get a Job in Technical Writing?

If you already have a background in a sector, then use that to start looking for work in other areas of the country. I come from an automotive background and write all over the world for many clients. Some I had to hunt for, some found me, but mostly, I kept writing and writing and building a portfolio.

Here are some steps you can take to get your foot in the door as a freelancer:

  1. Use your education or experience to search for work in an industry you want to work in;
  2. Build your portfolio on LinkedIn or your website and showcase your favorites;
  3. Network in your chosen field, not with other writers, but with people who share the same interests;
  4. Always look for jobs on job boards, websites, LinkedIn, and other places;
  5. Be ready with a CV and a resume for an interview that may be online via Zoom or Google;
  6. Freelancing is my thing because I hate offices and downtime, so start with one project and build from there. You’ll be surprised at what you can learn by jumping in. I made so many mistakes.

What is Healthcare Technical Writing?

While healthcare technical writing is going to be bigger and bigger every year, it’s something that you have to be well-versed in. It is the writing of content, marketing materials, and instructions for patient education, devices and drugs, and explaining medical procedures.

If you’ve come from a nursing background, this may be the place you want to start since you probably already have a strong understanding of the terminology, anatomy, and regulations used in the healthcare industry.

Even though I already mentioned this industry, I wanted to bring it up again because this is not just for anyone, but writers are needed.

Other Copywriting Markets

The following are some markets that may not be for everyone, but if you are even remotely interested in them, you can educate yourself. Particularly in the cannabis industry since it is growing exponentially with the states starting to open up cannabis for recreational use.

  • NFT
  • Cannabis
  • Translation
  • Guns and Alcohol
  • Real Estate

Many of these five are underserved simply because they are markets that require someone to go the extra mile to learn more about the industry and immerse themselves into it to become a trusted voice.

I know that I am moving towards working in the cannabis and real estate industries in addition to my automotive and insurance industries. New industries and learning are always a great way to sharpen your skills and explore new opportunities.

I hope you find your underserved industry. Check out the Barefoot Writer where you will find a lot more information on underserved niches, as well as other writing ideas. If you sign up, I will receive a small thank you from the Barefoot Writer, which helps me keep writing more!

Write Your Way to Success Writing About What You Love

Time and again, I have heard teachers say, “Write what you know”. Well, what if what I know is not that interesting? I know how to make ice, but I wouldn’t write a whole column with step-outs on how to make ice. I might be interested in an ice maker, though. I also might be interested in writing about the different types of ice makers, but that’s about as exciting as watching paint dry. While it has benefits for those who are interested in buying an ice maker – and I am one of them – I cannot imagine spending a whole day or even weeks writing about ice makers.

What I can imagine spending a whole day writing about is something that I love.

I have been fortunate enough to love cars, as well as write about them. The same is true for my trivia books and my jewelry books. I love puzzles and games, and I have written crossword puzzles, word search puzzles and fill in the blanks puzzles. Most of those puzzles have been used to market a product, but the end result is I was able to write about something I love.

The benefits of writing about what you love:

  • You’re never out of ideas
  • You never get tired of coming up with new copy
  • You can talk for hours to a client about why you should write their copy
  • You never have to fake your passion
  • It doesn’t take much to get you excited
  • You want to write and write and write

I am sure there are many more benefits, but these are the ones that I run into daily, so I thought I would share them with you. I hope find something that you are passionate about and can spend your time writing and writing and writing.

AWAI helps people get started writing copy that can lead to you writing about the things you love. Here is a link to give you an idea of the programs they have available. 

Is Kindle Publishing Right for Me?

This topic has been done to death by every blogger in the universe. So, why one more post? Because I’ve used Kindle publishing to publish my books, and I like it. Besides, I get to call myself an Indie Publisher by using Kindle Create to publish my book.

Seriously though, my books are all non-fiction, so that makes a big difference in the scheme of things. As a non-fiction writer, I can drill down on publishers to find the ones that fit the niche for my book. For instance, I write trivia and have a series on music trivia covering the top hits of the decade, which is considered pop culture. A lot of publishers cover pop culture. Since my books are based on U.S. pop charts, then I stand a better chance of getting them published if I limit my searches to U.S.-based publishing houses.

Those who write fiction books need to find a publisher in the genre of their choice. This is a little easier when you realize that many authors in your genre thank their agents in the acknowledgments and the publisher is on the spine and front pages.  If you decide to go the way of traditional publishing, the leads are there for you to follow.

Pros of Self-Publishing
You have total control over the outcome
You have total control over the outcome
Cons of Self-Publishing
You have total control over the marketing
You have total control over the marketing

I am not kidding about the pros and cons. 

Total Control over the Outcome–It means that you control every aspect of the editing, printing, formatting, delivery, and cover creation of your finished work. That sounds great on paper, but it adds a lot of workload to writers who only want to write.

If you’re not well-versed in editing (possibly using the Chicago Manual of Style or Associated Press Stylebook), then you might want to hire an editor. I usually do hire someone to take a look at my final manuscript before releasing a book. I am amazed at how many errors I make in the simplest of texts and editing is not my strong suit, but I hope to get better.

I also use Grammarly (an AI add-on to Word with a free version) to do at least one once-over before turning it over to someone to edit. At least then my errors won’t be so embarrassing.

I hire editors from Upwork, and there are many freelance writers doing gig work on Fivver who edit manuscripts. I have hired folks from both places and have been happy with the results.

Here are some links that might help you with the editing phase of your book:

Cover design is another part of the publishing process that you may need to hire out if you’re not proficient in Photoshop, Paint Shop Pro, or Gimp. I do my own covers, and I buy my art from Creative Market or use my own photos as I did on my hiking Yosemite book. Both of my trivia books have cover art from Creative Market by the same artist. 

I will make this post a part of a series on Kindle publishing because this is a BIG topic with a lot of parts to it.

1950s Music Trivia
Think you can answer these 1950s music trivia questions?
1960s music trivia
Music trivia from the 1960s

Total Control over the Marketing–This is one of the most difficult parts of writing and publishing a book. If you thought writing was tough, wait until you start to market your book! Amazon gives us the ability to create ads from our published works. All you have to do is give them money, and they will place your books all over Amazon where they will be seen by people interested in the subject you write about. While that’s all well and good, if you have a niche book, you want to go outside to find places to advertise.

Your book might do well being advertised in traditional print magazines and newspapers, or as banner ads on blogs and websites, and other affiliate marketing bloggers. It may also do well as ads on Facebook and newsgroups all over the internet.

You will need to do a lot of research to find the right place to advertise your book since you know the intended audience. My music books would advertise well on music-related blogs or newsgroups, and my jewelry design book would do well on arts and crafts sites. The upside to ensuring that your books are being seen by the right audience is to do it yourself.

Another big positive about doing it all yourself is that it’s on your schedule and not someone else’s. If your editor suggests edits, then you can do them when you have time.

A great big negative is that there is no advance on future royalties sitting in your bank account. You must live on whatever your royalties are for your current sales. They are paid in real-time, so there is no waiting, but if you want a steady income, you have to move on to your next book as soon as you send the first one to the editor.

There is no get-rich scheme here. It is all hard work, and it can take years to write a book, but there is no reason you have to wait years to find out if the one you did write will ever get published. There is no shame in being an indie publisher, and even the big authors find it useful for smaller projects.

We’ll chat about some of the other finer points of self-publishing in the future. Until then, keep writing and get your manuscript ready for the world to read. 

Want to know more about Kindle? This book is a good place to start.

The Benefits of Writers being Readers

If you want to write, it’s probably because you spent your childhood reading. Once you discover the magic of being swept away in a great story, it’s hard to imagine yourself doing anything but writing. 

Reading can be instrumental in enhancing your writing career. 

Here are a few benefits of being a reader:

  • Understand story structure 
  • Help get a feel for what readers want in a story
  • Get  your creative juices flowing with new ideas 
  • Learn from famous authors 
  • Enhance your language skills and learn new words 
  • Explore new genres and styles
  • Learn what doesn’t work and why
  • Learn new cultures and lifestyles 

​There are so many other reasons to read, but these are some of the most beneficial to you as a writer. 

Life is busy, but make time to read. Kindle on your phone puts books at your fingertips, so when you’re waiting in line or at an appointment, you can find a few minutes to read the next chapter of a book. 

When your writing needs a boost, pick up a good book and start reading. 


Do You Need a Niche for Copywriting?

If you want to drill down on your copywriting skills, you can consider focusing on a niche that focuses on your interests. Once you decide what you want to write about – I write in the automotive industry because I love cars – you can narrow this down even further. When you narrow your focus down, it makes it easier to search for new clients.

Here are some niches you might consider:

  • Blog Copywriting
  • Article Copywriting
  • Advertising Copywriting
  • Product Description Copywriting
  • SaaS Copywriting
  • SEO Copywriting

What’s something that interests you?
I mean REALLY interests you… something you would be thrilled to write about every day and get paid to do it.
Once you have an answer, go here.
I’ll show you how you can get paid to write about it.

You can do it in your spare time… anywhere from 5-10 hours a week…

And you can generate passive income, which means it comes in whether you’re working or not… earning $750, $1,500, $3,500 or even more — month after month.

Go here to learn more about this exciting writing opportunity.

Not sure which niche you want?

​I suggest you do a Pro and Con list that can help you make that decision.

What do you like about it?
What do you know about it?
Can you make a living writing about it?
Will you be able to find clients?
How hard will it be to find your first client?

And so on. I hope you find your niche because things get a lot easier once you do.

Can You Write a Simple Letter?

Writing a simple letter could be the start to a new source of income. Maybe you write full-time like I do or maybe you want to write full-time like I do. Either way, it helps to have a lot of tools in your toolbox like having some copywriting training. I know that I saw the Barefoot Writer magazine when I was getting ready to quit my full-time job at the newspaper. I read all of these great stories about people who left their jobs and made a bazillion dollars while putting their cocktails on tables and sunscreen on their arms. Sounded great to me!

Copy and Content Writers are Needed!

I don’t make a gazillion dollars writing copy on the side, but I do make a nice little handful of change each month that is more than equal to my last weekly paycheck at the newspaper. When I add that money into my content writing, I am making a small living doing this. Will it get better? I don’t know, but what I do know is that copywriters and content writers are in demand NOW. Everyone is selling online and they all need people like you and me to write their copy. I suggest that you check out the AWAI program. They have a lot of programs that you can choose from, and it can be quite fun to do some copywriting on the side. Where else can you switch between writing about products like candles, gear shift knobs and chalk markers in a single afternoon? It’s fun and it’s always something a little different. Check out this program here:  

Or maybe you would just like to get the magazine so you can envy those writers with cocktails and toes in the sand. Check it out here:

This post was proofread by Grammarly

​Is Copywriting Right for Me?


Copywriting is the art of selling with a typewriter – or in today’s terms, a word processor. Or maybe, you’re just writing the sales pitches out longhand. I do that for some of the email marketing pieces I am working on. I noodle better with a pen. I find it easier to dash off 10 headline ideas on paper than the PC. However, when I write my final copy on the PC, I usually end up changing it because for me, the PC brings out more structure in my writing. I don’t know why. It just does.

Copywriting isn’t the same as novel writing, but it is storytelling. The long sales brochures, mail products or sales copies are more like the original full page ads that have told stories and sold elixirs for years. Today, those are still around, but much of today’s copywriting is about writing for the web and emails. I will write more about the different types of copywriting later.

There are so many ways to use copywriting skills, even if you never write an ad for a company. Persuasive text is needed for product descriptions, SMS, MMS, social media posts, and any other format that your client wants to use to connect with their buyers.

Do You Like to Write?
If you like to write, then copywriting can be a ton of fun. It’s a lot like putting a puzzle together. You find out what the company is selling, who they are selling it to and use that information to write something very clever. You need to persuade the reader to buy the product.  There are hits and misses like all forms of writing, but it is never personal, so keep going.

Do You Like to do Research?
Research is the key to the art of copywriting. You cannot sell something to someone if you don’t know 1) anything about the product and 2) anything about the prospects. Some of copywriting is learning about the product, but the bulk it is learning about the prospect. Is it a man or a woman? Do they like dogs, cats or butterflies? What is their income? Demographics play a big part in how you tailor a message.

Do You Have a Good Sense of Humor?
Under all of the ‘technospeak’ about a product, it helps to have a sense of humor. Everyone knows that sex sells, but humor connects people in a more casual and relaxed way that is important when it comes to sales. You don’t have to be able to write humorous dialog, but it helps if you can be more lighthearted. All you have to do is think about the television commercials that made you smile or even, laugh out loud.

How Do You Know What to Write?
Writing for a client is a lot different than writing for yourself or your editor. All clients should give you a content brief about what they want to see in their copy. They may have the keywords ready for you or give you topic ideas, but whether writing copy or content, a brief keeps you on target, as well as gives the client a way to track progress. Here is a link to an article on creative briefs.

If you think this might be something you would enjoy writing, then I recommend a couple of courses to learn more about copywriting. I have taken and studied courses, and they have all helped me move forward in a side job that I enjoy.

Udemy Complete Copywriting Course: Write to Sell Like a Pro from Tamsin Henderson 

Why Does a Copywriter Need a Creative Brief?

My day job requires me to write and write and write some more. Of all the words I write, most of them are written for a purpose other than to amuse myself. My day job is to write ad copy and content articles for clients who want to use my words to sell their products. I am cognizant that as a copywriter and a content writer I need to write words that mean something to the company I am working with and reach the customers that will buy their products.

Automotive content writing and email marketing copywriting have basic formulas to follow, but what those formulas do not give you is answers to what the client wants.

There is nothing more frustrating for everyone than a lack of instructions, having to do multiple rewrites and having no clear direction for the copy or content. You should always have a content brief when you take on any writing project. It will save you and your client time.

Copywriters, if your client does not have a brief, then supply them with one and help them fill it out. I am including a free content brief template at the end of this article.

What is a Content Brief Template? 

A brief is, well, brief. It is a set of very simple instructions from the client to you, the writer, that lays out their goals, their desires, their favorite keywords and their audience. Briefs can be as simple or as complicated as the client needs. It consists of a series of questions that can be answered in short sentences or notes. All you do is fill in the blanks, and you are ready to outline your article.

There are many creative brief templates on the market, as well as free content brief templates that you can download.

Why Do I Need a Content Brief? 

A content brief is a time management tool that keeps your writing on track.

Since all of the questions will be answered upfront by the brief, you can start writing immediately and submit the finished project to the client for review.

A brief makes it easy for you to edit your article, check off your keywords and make sure that you have followed all of the client’s instructions as to what content they wanted to include.

How Important are Keywords? 

Anyone who has been writing during the internet age is fully aware of the purpose and importance of keywords. Only a client who knows their business inside and out will be able to give the writer the keywords they want to use to drive their traffic. You might have suggestions for them, but the keywords should be something they provide. They should know which long-tail keywords will drive sales to their site.

A brief includes keyword information to be used in the article.

Your brief helps everyone stay on track and is a written reference for everyone involved. If the brief is clear and concise, the ad copy will also be on point and an effective marketing tool.

Here are some tools that might make your next projects a little easier: 

  • Grammarly checks your grammar and spelling. It has a freebie edition, as well as a paid edition. 
  • The One Hour Content Plan by Meera Kothand is a number 1 bestseller for all of us scribblers. 
  • The Kindle Unlimited link may allow you to read the book for free. Her book has been in the Kindle Unlimited library in the past, and may be again. If not, there are many other books that will help guide your content writing career. 


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